English mistakes made by Brazilians

It’s OK to make mistakes… in English!

Lingoloop has students from all over the world. Over time, we’ve noticed that students from the same countries (or regions) tend to make similar mistakes. 

Many of our students are from Brazil. Brazil is the largest and most populous country in South America. Unlike the other countries in South America that speak Spanish, Brazilians speak Portuguese. The pronunciation of the Portuguese language is quite different from that of English which can create some unique challenges. Today we will focus on some of the English speaking mistakes we notice that Brazilian English learners make.

 

Adding the “ee” sound

Brazilians tend to add the “ee” sound to the end of many words. For “Netflix” they might say “Net-ee-flix-ee.” The reason is that Portuguese words don’t end with consonant sounds. 

 

Negative sentences in the past tense

Brazilians sometimes struggle with forming negative statements in the past (in English). For example, they may say “I did not heard that” or “She didn’t ate yet.”  This is because in Portugese to form negative sentences in past tense only requires adding “näo” to the past tense form of the verb. It’s not so simple in English!

 

Using “keep” for “put”

Brazilians tend to use the word ”keep” when they really mean “put.”  For example, they may say “go keep it on the table” instead of “go put it on the table.” It has to do with the translation of the verb “guardar” which can be used to mean keep, save or put. 

 

Using “do” instead of  “does”

It is not natural for Brazilians to use the word “does.” Often they will just use “do” in place of “does.” For example they may say “Do it make sense?” 

 

 

Dropped “s”on 3rd person verbs

Brazilians sometimes forget to add the “s” to a verb when the subject is in the third person. For example you may hear “He work very hard on the project.” Of course the proper way is to say “he works.” To be fair, students from other countries get this wrong as well.

 

No use of “an”  

Brazilians don’t use “an” in English because that concept doesn’t exist in Portuguese. For example they may say “a apple” instead of “an apple.”

 

The “th” sound….

Most Portuguese speakers have trouble with the “th” sound. When they say a word starting with ”th” they pronounce it with a “d” sound. 

 

They wash their hands with soup

In Portuguese “sopa” is “soup” and “sabao” is “soap.” So it can be confusing for Brazilians to say the word “soap” because they automatically think of “soup.” Is that confusing enough? 

It’s not easy speaking English when it’s not your first language, and we know that English learners from certain parts of the world have distinct tendencies and make very specific mistakes. Regardless of your mother tongue, the best way to improve your English speaking is to practice doing it! Sign up for a Lingoloop free trial class today!

 

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